Axver (axver) wrote,
Axver
axver

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Sometimes, criteria sheets require corrections.

I bring you an entry of satire. I am particularly amused by the revised marking matrix.

Page 1: cover sheet.

YEAR 12

MODERN HISTORY

WRITTEN RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT


Name:
Class:
Teacher:
Time: 6-8 minutes
Semester: Four
SUMMATIVE

INSTRUCTIONS:


1. Research ONE OF THE FOLLOWING TOPICS, DERIVE A QUESTION or HYPOTHESIS, and then prepare an argument to be presented orally.

2. You must use ≥ 8 sources, looking for primary as well as secondary sources.

3. ALL RESEARCH NOTES MUST BE HANDED IN TOGETHER WITH A FORMAL BIBLIOGRAPHY, SHOWING CLEARLY THE SOURCES OF ALL NOTES.

Your presentation will be taped for marking purposes.

Page 2: detailed topics sheet.

YEAR 12

MODERN HISTORY

RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT

ORAL PRESENTATION


From the topics below, derive a hypothesis and prepare an argument for oral presentation (6-8 minutes)


1. The historical development of anti-semitism in the world.

2. Anti-semitism in Nazi Germany.

3. Anti-semitism in Russia and the Soviet Union.

4. Anti-semitism in the Western World.

5. The role of anti-semitism in the struggle to re-establish Israel since World War Two.

6. Discuss the changing concepts regarding the Aboriginal place in Australian society.

7. The “White Australia” policy, and its role in the development of 20th Century history.

8. The effects on Australian society of Southern European and Asian migration into Australia – is this a racist issue, a social and economic issue, or a mixture of all of these?

9. Any other topic on racial discrimination pre-approved by the teacher.

Page 3: marking matrix.

Criterion Standard A Standard B Standard C Standard D Standard E
1. Knowledge and understanding. The student:
• Consistently and accurately recalls and uses an extensive range of factual information.
• Consistently demonstrates a depth of historical understanding by accurately using several historical concepts, including some abstract concepts in the context of an explanation.
The student:
• On most occasions accurately recalls and uses a range of factual information.
• On most occasions demonstrates historical understanding by accurately using several historical concepts.
The student:
• On most occasions accurately recalls and uses some basic factual information.
• Sometimes demonstrates historical understanding, but tends to use simple and concrete historical concepts.
The student:
• Sometimes accurately recalls factual information from some areas of the course.
• Sometimes demonstrates historical understanding by mentioning basic historical concepts.
The student:
• Demonstrates a fragmented knowledge of the factual information.
• Demonstrates little understanding of basic historical concepts.
2. Research. The student:
• Identifies complex issues for investigation, forms and focuses a manageable key questions, and sequences probing subquestions.
• Submits well-organised research notes taken from a range of sources that reflect stages of investigation and adjustments made during research.
The student:
• Identifies issues for investigation, frames and focuses a manageable key question and related subquestions.
• Submits organised research notes taken from a range of sources and reflecting some response to issues as they emerge during research.
The student:
• With initial assistance, identifies issues for investigation and frames a key question and subquestions.
• Submits research notes from a range of sources that reflect some attempt to adjust the process to issues as they emerge during research.
The student:
• With assistance, identifies basic issues and frames research questions.
• Submits research notes from a limited range of sources that lack cohesion and organisation.
The student:
• Relies upon others to identify issues for investigation and frame appropriate questions.
• Submits fragmented research notes from sources that may be irrelevant to the research.
3. Critical use of sources. The student:
• Makes valid decisions about historical questions based on sophisticated and rigorous interpretation and analysis and on evaluation of available resources.
The student:
• Makes valid decisions based on interpretation and analysis and on evaluation of obvious problematic characteristics of sources used.
The student:
• Offers decisions that are often unwarranted and that are not supported by interpretation and analysis and by evaluation of sources.
The student:
• Offers decisions that are often unwarranted and that are not supported by interpretation and analysis and by evaluation of sources.
The student:
• Offers decisions that are characterized by invalidity, irrelevance and incoherence and that are not supported by interpretation and analysis and by evaluation of resources.
4. Communication. The student:
• Produces a non-written presentation that is consistently in accord with the style and convention appropriate to the task.
• Demonstrates non-written communication skills that are appropriate to purpose and effective in illustrating or explaining concepts or conclusions.
The student:
• Produces a non-written presentation that largely in accord with the style and conventions appropriate to the task.
• Demonstrates non-written communication skills that are appropriate to purpose and assist in illustrating or explaining concepts or conclusions.
The student:
• Produces a non-written presentation in which, despite errors in style and conventions, the meaning is generally discernible.
• Attempts to use non-written communication skills, but has only partial success in conveying understanding.
The student:
• Produces a non-written presentation in which, despite errors in style and conventions, the meaning is generally discernible.
• Attempts to use non-written communication skills, but has only partial success in conveying understanding.
The student:
• Produces a non-written presentation in which errors in style and conventions obscure the meaning.
• Demonstrates little ability to convey understanding in non-written forms.


Page 1: cover sheet.

YEAR 12

MODERN HISTORY

LAME ASSIGNMENT FOR SLACK PEOPLE


Name:
Class:
Teacher:
Time: 6-8 seconds
Semester: Four
SUMMATIVE

INSTRUCTIONS:


1. Read THE FOLLOWING TOPICS, ASK A QUESTION about what they mean, and then prepare a sentence to tell the class.

2. You must use 0 sources, but find one to make yourself look good.

3. Don’t worry about notes. We don’t read them anyway.
Your presentation will be taped for marking purposes and then the tape will be used to record a test cricket match.

Page 2: detailed topics sheet.

YEAR 12

MODERN HISTORY

LAME ASSIGNMENT FOR SLACKERS

SENTENCE STATEMENT


From the topics below, ask a question and prepare a sentence to say to the class (6-8 seconds)


1. The historical development of laziness in the world.

2. Anti-laziness policies in Nazi concentration camps.

3. Why you are actually reading these options when you won’t say anything intelligent anyway.

4. The Western World. You know, place where you live. Look outside.

5. Israel and World War Two. Remember that?

6. Those black people you sometimes see on TV.

7. The “White Australia” policy and why it was BAAAAAD. No, not like a sheep. That would be a “White New Zealand” policy.

8. The effects on Australian society by non-American pop culture programming– is it crap, in another language, has weird plots, makes you think for a brief second, or a mixture of all of these?

9. Any other topic unapproved by the teacher.

Page 3: marking matrix.

Criterion Standard A Standard B Standard C Standard D Standard E
1. Knowledge and understanding. The student:
• Forgets factual information and doesn’t understand anything about history.
The student:
• Remembers his/her name and year level.
The student:
• Does either half of Standard B.
The student:
• Stands up. Extra credit for remembering what a name is.
The student:
• Does nothing.
2. Research. • Knows what research is and hands in a piece of paper with indecipherable scribble on it. • Is aware of the correct spelling of ‘research’ and has a vague idea of what it is. • Successfully responds with words (in language of choice) when told how ‘research’ is spelled. • Is aware he/she should have done more. • Does nothing.
3. Critical use of sources. • Formulates words based upon reading. • Thinks a bit before responding. • May have thought while responding. • Evidence of brain activity. • Does nothing.
4. Communication. • Speaks comprehensible English most of the time. • Some words are readily identifiable as English. • Manages to articulate thoughts in more than mere grunts. • Grunts and burps. • Does nothing.


That's what a productive study lesson can devolve into.

Other details from today;
- Be a rebel: wear your uniform on a non-uniform day because you want to.
- Goethe was a pretty weird fellow. I can't wait to be done with German, and there's less than a month to go. Yay for university Latin next year.
- Is it just me, or does logic dictate that a school with a heavy focus on Performing Arts would have a really good Battle of the Bands contest? Obviously my school ignores logic's dictates. The Battle of the Bands today was simply dreadful. I still have an awful Blink 182 song stuck in my head. Someone covered a Jet song and it was even worse than the original (if that's possible), some group performed a song they wrote themselves and clearly didn't think it out sufficiently because their singer was completely out of time, and there were some people playing instrumental covers of Nirvana. Now I don't mean to offend any Nirvana fans, but if Kurt Kobain hadn't popped himself off at the height of his fame, no-one would remember who Nirvana were. I find their music to be totally uncreative and boring. I could go on and on about this Battle of the Bands. I sat half the length of the school away, alternating between sucking on an ice cup and holding my head in my hands. There was no escaping the badness.
- People suck at interpreting Revelation. If you aren't familiar with the symbolism of Jewish Apocalyptic literature and/or think this book should be read literally, it might be a good idea to avoid reading much past the third chapter.
- I am intrigued by Vanessa Carlton's cover of Streets. Her voice doesn't really suit the song, but the piano intro is beautiful. It's probably the best cover I've heard of Streets, though considering its untouchable nature, that might not be saying a lot. Rule #1 of performing Streets: ensure your name is one of Bono Vox, The Edge, Adam Clayton, or Larry Mullen Junior and make sure you are in a band with the other three named U2. If you do not fulfill that criteria, do not even think of covering the song.
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